laparigidimariaantoniettablog:

Coat and trousers wore by Louis Charles, future Louis XVII. 1792
Musee Galliera Paris

laparigidimariaantoniettablog:

Coat and trousers wore by Louis Charles, future Louis XVII. 1792

Musee Galliera Paris


40 notes | Reblog
4 months ago

historyofromanovs:

Murdered Royal Children in History

  • Edward V of England: murdered by smothering in 1483 at the age of 12-13, along with his brother. Responsibility for their deaths is widely attributed to Richard III.
  • Louis XVII of France: neglected and starved to death by his captors after the French Revolution. He was only ten.
  • Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York: murdered by smothering in 1483, the younger brother of Edward V. He was only 9-10 years old.
  • Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia: murdered by the Bolsheviks on 17 July 1918, along with her siblings. Their crimes? Just for being a Romanov. Aged 22.
  • Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia: murdered by the Bolsheviks in the early morning of 17 July 1918. She was just 21.
  • Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia: murdered by the Bolsheviks along with her family. She turned 19 a mere three weeks before being murdered.
  • Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia: murdered by the Bolsheviks on 17 July 1918. She turned 17 just the month before.
  • Nicholas Knatchbull: descendant of British Royalty, most notably Queen Victoria. Nicholas was killed by the 1979 IRA bombing that also killed his royal grandfather, a friend, and another relative. He was 14.
  • Tsarevich Alexei Nikolaevich of Russia: murdered by the Bolsheviks. He was less than a month shy of turning 14.

238 notes | Reblog
5 months ago
carolathhabsburg:

Empress Eugenie of France and son, prince imperial Napoleon Eugene. Circa 1859

carolathhabsburg:

Empress Eugenie of France and son, prince imperial Napoleon Eugene. Circa 1859


17 notes | Reblog
6 months ago
vivelareine:

A portrait of Marie Thérèse Charlotte and her brother, Louis Joseph, by Elisabeth Vigée-Le Brun. 1784image: (C) RMN-Grand Palais (Château de Versailles) / Gérard Blot

vivelareine:

A portrait of Marie Thérèse Charlotte and her brother, Louis Joseph, by Elisabeth Vigée-Le Brun. 1784

image: (C) RMN-Grand Palais (Château de Versailles) / Gérard Blot


56 notes | Reblog
6 months ago

fortheloveofroyalty:

FTLOR’s 100 Favorite Royal Jewels ()

↳ 3. The Duchess of Angoulême’s Tiara

"The tiara consists of 40 emeralds set in gold weighing 7.7-carats and over 1,000 diamonds set in silver weighing 176-carats. It was a gift to Marie-Thérèse, Duchess of Angoulême, Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI’s only surviving child."


790 notes | Reblog
6 months ago

The Hope pearl, previously owned by King Louis XIV of France, is displayed in the V&A’s ‘Pearls’ exhibition in west London on September 18, 2013. Running from September 21, 2013 to January 19, 2014, the exhibition includes items of jewellery worn by aristocracy and celebrities as well as explaining the science behind their creation.


17 notes | Reblog
7 months ago
tiny-librarian:

Detail of a portrait of the Princesse de Lamballe.

tiny-librarian:

Detail of a portrait of the Princesse de Lamballe.


92 notes | Reblog
7 months ago

thelegendends:

HISTORY MEME - FRANCE VERSION ♛ [08/09] kings/queen : Marie Leszczynska  (23 june 1703- 24 june 1768)

Queen consort of France.  She was a daughter of King Stanisław Leszczyński of Poland  and Catherine Opalińska. She married King Louis XV of France and was the grandmother of Louis XVI, Louis XVIII, and Charles X. She was the longest-serving queen consort of France. Maria was on a list of 99 eligible European princesses to marry the young king. The marriage by proxy took place on 15 August 1725 in the Cathedral of Strasbourg, Louis XV represented by his cousin the Duke of Orléans, Louis le Pieux. Louis and Marie first met on the eve of their wedding, which took place on 5 September 1725, at the Château de Fontainebleau. Marie was twenty-two years old and Louis fifteen. The young couple was reported to have fallen in love at first sight. The announcement of the wedding was not received well as the royal court; as the father of Marie had been a monarch for only a short time, she was thought to be a poor choice. There were rumours before the wedding that the bride was ugly, epileptic and sterile. However, Marie was popular among the people from the beginning, such as when she handed out money on her way to her wedding in Fontainebleau. After the difficult birth of Princess Louise in 1737, which nearly took her life, Marie had no more children. In 1738, she refused Louis entrance to her bedroom, and after this, their private relationship ended, though the formal marriage continued in spite of her husband’s infidelities. Louis XV was a notorious womaniser. Several of his mistresses, particularly Madame de Pompadour, who was introduced at the court of Versailles in 1745 on the occasion of the marriage of the Dauphin Louis, eventually eclipsed the Queen’s social status. Most of her husband’s romantic affairs were conducted with her knowledge, and she either simply accepted them, or was powerless to stop them. Throughout, she displayed an attitude of discretion and dignity and maintained a civil relationship towards Madame de Pompadour. Queen Marie never managed to acquire political influence. She made an attempt to involve herself in politics at the very beginning of their marriage when she, in 1726, asked Louis to appoint the unpopular Prince of Condé as a Cabinet minister, despite her father’s warnings. King Louis took her attempt to become involve in politics very badly, and after 1726 she was completely separated from affairs of state and any political influence on Louis. Marie Leszczynsaka was truly a people’s queen. Her death on 24 June 1768 at the age of 65 was a huge blow to the French monarchy. She was buried at the Basilica of St Denis and her heart deposed at the Church of Notre-Dame-de-Bonsecours in Nancy.


129 notes | Reblog
7 months ago

History meme » nine kings/queens - Eleanor of Aquitane [8/9]


268 notes | Reblog
7 months ago

uno-sole-minor:

TODAY
On the 1st of september 1715, died the Sun King.

"After a week of slow agony, Louis XIV passed away in Versailles on 1 September 1715 at 8.15 in the morning, just before his 77th birthday. A reign of 72 years ended, the longest in the history of France. Another reign almost as long began: that of Louis XV (1715-1774).

Worthy of a tragedy of Racine, the death of Louis XIV began on 10 August 1715. On his return from hunting in Marly, the king felt a sharp pain in his leg. His doctor Fagon diagnosed sciatica and never budged from this position. But black spots soon began to appear: the sign of senile gangrene. Despite the atrocious pain, the king continued with his usual occupations without flinching. He intended to carry out his functions until the end. The old oak seemed ineradicable and won the admiration of all. But on 25 August, his feast day, he had to take to his bed. He was not to leave his bedchamber.

The gangrene then affected his bones the next day. The doctors felt helpless. The king received on the same day his great-grandson, aged 5, the future Louis XV, to give him advice. He recommended him to relieve his people’s suffering and avoid war as far as possible: “it is the ruin of peoples!” Aware of having failed on this point, he asked him to remain a “peace-loving prince”
.
But his death took longer than expected. The king made his adieux to Mme de Maintenon three times and twice to the Court. A Provençal named Brun was allowed to approach the royal bed on 29 August: he claimed to have a miraculous cure. In fact, the king did feel better. But the disease was still there and making progress. Louis XIV finally went into a semi-coma lasting the next two days. He died on 1 September in the morning. His body was on view for eight days in the Mercury salon. He was transported to Saint-Denis on 9 September.

The Duc d’Orléans, nephew of Louis XIV, became Regent of the kingdom until the majority of the future Louis XV. The family quarrels began: on 2 September, the Regent persuaded the Parliament of Paris to annul the testament of the king which confiscated some of the assembly’s prerogatives. He governed from his residence in the Palais-Royal and installed the future king in the Tuileries palace on 9 September. The Court left Versailles. Philippe V of Spain, however, had not totally abandoned his claims to the throne of France in spite of the Treaty of Ryswick in 1713. A new war was on the way and with it a new combination of alliances in Europe…”

(Source: en.chateauversailles.fr)


77 notes | Reblog
7 months ago

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